Film Investing Article from the Wall Street Journal

Investors Fill Film Funding Gap | Film Investing Article
Important quotes from this Wall Street Journal to note for yourself, the Film Maker, and your Film Business Plan:

Source and Full Wall Street Journal Article: Investors Fill Film Funding Gap, June 14, 2010 ©


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Film Investing Article about "Precious" from the New York Times

Think you have it rough? Lee Daniels is known for producing controversial films, such as The Woodsman starring Kevin Bacon as a convicted sex offender and Monster’s Ball, a melodrama about bigotry and interracial love in the South. The first film he directed, Shadowboxer, which he also produced, has a loony premise: a hit man having an affair with his dying stepmother and raising a child together.

When figuring out the film financing, Daniels had to face that Shadowboxer hadn’t done so well. “It was very, very hard to get financing for Precious. All the studios said no. They didn’t want to make a film about a 350-pound black girl who is abused. Everybody kept saying no. My whole life was no. It was just a bunch of nos.”

Eventually, Daniels found independent financing. For Shadowboxer, he found a “ rich man in Philadelphia who paid for the movie, God bless him.” For Precious, Daniels raised the initial $8 million from Sarah Siegel-Magness and Gary Magness, who live in Denver.

Things to note in this article for yourself, the Film Maker, and your Business Plan:

Source and Full Article: The Audacity of ‘Precious’ New York Times, October 25, 2009 ©


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Film Investing Article from the Wall Street Journal

Will Investing in a Film Noir Put You in the Black?
This article discusses how many films from the blockbuster "Avatar" to low-budget independent films like "Paranormal Activity," rely on hedge funds or individual investors to help provide funding. They highlight that film investing pay offs can be as high as 50% to 100% in the first three years, IF a film is successful, which is a big "if."

The film investing article then goes on to advise potential movie investors how to minimize their risk, making them aware of many of the things that could possibly go wrong during filming. The author tells film investors, "as with any business investment, you want to see a well-conceived marketing and distribution plan that makes sense and isn't built on hope."

He continues, ""To improve your odds of success, the first—and most crucial—question to ask is: "How will I get repaid?" (Note: as you know, FilmProposals has been saying this for years and is exactly why we created our Business Plan Tools for Film, to help you answer this question)

Things to note in this article for your information and also to use in your Business Plan:

Source and Full Wall Street Journal Article: Will Investing in a Film Noir Put You in the Black?, May 29, 2010 ©


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